Grammar: The imperative eat drink and be merry

“Go!”
“Eat!”, “Drink!”
“Eat, drink and be merry, for tomorrow we may die.”
“Don’t eat that!”

The imperative is the base form of the verb (the infinitive without ‘to’: “eat”, “drink”, “Stop”, “go” etc.)
“Don’t walk on the grass” (the negative)
“Don’t be silly”
“Do not do that!”
“Do not leave your clothes on the floor!”

     Consulta el Indice completo del Audio

   

 

Grammar: WILL

Don’t use ‘will’ for future plans or arrangements, use ‘going to’ or the present continuous:
red-hand of ulster

“Tomorrow I’m going to meet my grandmother.”

Will is an auxiliary modal verb.
Will does not have an ‘s’ in the third person.
The negative of will is ‘won’t’ (will not)
Use will to make predictions: “Do you think there will be a referendum in Cataluña?”

“Going to” can also be used for predictions, but usually when there is EVIDENCE. For example, “Look at that huge black cloud in the sky, I think it’s going to rain.”

Who do you think will win the next World Cup?
Reza thinks Holland will win.

Use will to express certainty (certeza) or confidence.
I’m sure you’ll (you will) agree that Ecuador is a beautiful country.
Ahh, that’ll be the postman!
Mary’s really nice. She’ll definitely help us.
She won’t marry me. She doesn’t love me anymore.

  Consulta el Indice completo del Audio

 

Grammar: Clauses. Phrases and sentences

¡OJO! – The word ‘phrase’ is a false friend. ‘Phrase’ in English does not translate to frase in Spanish. The word Frase in Spanish is translated as ‘sentence’.
Sentences begin with a capital letter and end with a full stop.
The basic unit of English grammar is the clause:
A phrase in English does not contain a subject and a verb. It cannot communicate a complete thought.
A clause does contain a subject and a verb and can convey a complete idea.

“A lovely girl sat next to me in the café yesterday”

A=article; lovely=adjective; girl=noun – ‘A lovely girl’ is a phrase.

‘A lovely girl sat next to me’ is a clause (‘A lovely girl’=subject; ‘sat’=verb)
‘I thought’ is also a clause (I=subject, thought=verb)
‘I thought about you.’ (I=subject, thought=verb, about=preposition, you=indirect object)
“A lovely girl (1st frase) sat next to me (2nd frase) in the café yesterday (3rd frase)”
“A lovely girl sat next to me (clause)”
“A lovely girl sat next to me in the café yesterday” (sentence)

     Consulta el Indice completo del Audio

   

 

Grammar: English clauses

All clauses in English have at least two parts: a noun phrase and a verb phrase:

THE GIRL – Noun phrase (subject) SMILED – Verb phrase
ALL OF MY FRIENDS – Noun phrase (subject) WERE WATCHING – Verb phrase

But most clauses have more than two parts:

THE GIRL - SMILED
CRAIG - WANTED - A CUP OF TEA
REZA - HAS EATEN - TOO MANY POTATOES
THIS CAKE - TASTES - AWESOME!
CRAIG - IS - THE BEST TEACHER - IN VALENCIA
HE - PUT - THE BEER - IN THE FRIDGE

     Consulta el Indice completo del Audio


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11                  

- Tienes más ejercicios de Audio por niveles en la sección de LISTENING de nuestra web
- Dispones de más ejercicios gratuitos de inglés en la sección de EJERCICIOS y en la sección de PRÁCTICA de La Mansión del Inglés.
- De forma continua publicamos en nuestro canal de Facebook ejercicios para practicar y mejorar tu inglés.
- Accede a nuestros Cuadernos de Inglés gratis o bien suscríbete para recibirlos gratuitamente en tu email.

 
Descarga GRATIS nuestra
app de Podcast para aprender
Inglés para Iphone, Ipad, Ipod y Android

Descarga Gratis app podcast para aprender inglés

*También te puede interesar:

© Copyright La Mansión del Inglés C.B. - Todos los derechos reservados.
La Mansión del Inglés ®. Marca Registrada